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THE NEW ENGLAND OFFERING
 
The New England Offering Index
By
Judith Ranta

This is an annotated table of contents for The New England Offering prepared by Judith Ranta.  Published in Lowell from 1847 to 1850, The New England Offering initially featured writings by women currently or formerly employed in the mills.  In January, 1849, it opened its pages to contributions from all American female manual workers.  The first issue appeared in September, 1847.  Beginning in April, 1848, the periodical was published usually monthly until March, 1850, with irregular volume numbering.  Harriet Farley, a former mill weaver, served as the sole editor, and in April, 1849, she became the publisher, proprietor, and traveling agent as well.  Contents include fiction, poetry, essays, historical and travel narratives, engravings, editorials, and book reviews. 

Open Collections Program: Women Working: Magazines

Many of the following titles have a link to the article or image.  Using Find in the tool bar search for "See Holding."

Note: The following sources have been used for identifying the actual names behind some writers’ pseudonyms: 

Harriet Hanson Robinson, Names and Noms de Plume of the Writers in The Lowell Offering, 1902 (Reprinted in Judith Ranta, Women and Children of the Mills: An Annotated Guide to Nineteenth-Century American Textile Factory Literature [Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999], p. 299-300)

Harriet Hanson Robinson, Loom and Spindle; or, Life among the Early Mill Girls (1898; Kailua, Hawaii: Press Pacifica, 1976)

Harriet Hanson Robinson’s marginalia in New England Offering holdings at Boston Public Library

Research by Martha Mayo, Director of the Center for Lowell History

Research by Judith A. Ranta

Changes in title information, cover epigraphs, etc., are noted for the issues in which they first appear.

Abbreviations:
“m.” = married
“n.m.” = never married
 
 

V. 1 (September 1847), p. 1-48
 

P. 1: “Introductory” by H.F., July 5, 1847 [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley expresses hope “that ‘The New England Offering’ will be welcomed by the old patrons of ‘The Lowell Offering.’”  She gives the reasons for the Lowell Offering’s publication and demise as follows: “The Lowell Offering was established to prove that goodness and intelligence could and did exist in a factory community, and to remove the prejudice which had affixed itself to the cognomen of ‘Factory Girl.’  Assuming that these objects were accomplished, and wearied with cares attendant upon the publication of a Magazine, we discontinued it in December, 1845, but with the expressed hope that it might be resumed in some more favorable form, and under some more favorable circumstances.”  She maintains that she has been “solicited through the press and through many a private channel” to publish another magazine.  It will include writings by both factory operatives and “females who have gone from ‘the mills’ to be teachers and missionaries.”  “We pledge ourselves to nothing but endeavors for improvement, and to respect always the rights and feelings of others.”

P. 3-8: “The Uncommitted Sin” by H. Farley, “Stone House,” Lowell [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Allegorical religious fiction.  The angel of Justice and the angel of Charity consider the nature of human sin.

P. 8-17: “Pentucket” by M.R. Green [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Serial historical essay about the early history of Pentucket (now Haverhill, Massachusetts).

P. 18-24: “Reminiscences of Childhood” by J.L. Baker, Middlesex Corporation [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Autobiographical essay.  The narrator recalls the “cottage home” in New Hampshire (18), where she lived with her grandmother and Aunt Polly.  The text includes some detailed description of the home’s interior and exterior.  The narrator’s grandmother tells stories of leaving Long Island after her marriage to settle in New Hampshire (22).

P. 24: “Musings” by M.F.F., Merrimack Corporation [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)].  Poem expressing sadness, weariness, and wishes for the “bright eternal home.”

P. 25-30: “True Greatness” by L.A.B., Middlesex Corporation [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Historical essay about great historical figures, including Achilles, Homer, Xerxes I, Alexander the Great, Napoleon Bonaparte, and George Washington.  Baker also praises several great American women: Ann Hasletine, Harriet Atwood, Mrs. Newell, and Mrs. Judson.  In conclusion, Baker asserts, “One man only . . . possessed the perfection of true greatness; and that man was the man Jesus Christ.” 

P. 31-32: “Farewell to New England” by L.S. Hall, Eagletown, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad written as Hall was “leaving Lowell for Arkansas as a missionary to the Choctaws” (H.H.R.).  The final stanza: “Good bye! -- I go to culture, / Flowers of immortal bloom, / I leave thee sadly, gladly, / My dearer, dearest home.”  An appended editor’s note explains, “This poem was written impromptu by Miss Hall upon leaving New England.”

P. 33-36: Prose Poems. By L. Larcom, Looking Glass Prairie, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  I. The Broken Icicle.  II. The Prairie Violets.  III. The Flown Birds.  IV. The Song before the Storm.  As Larcom noted, “2, 3, and 4 were written while teaching a prairie district school, at noon-recess” (H.H.R.).

P. 36-38: “Reflect!” by Maria, Wentworth, NH. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Essay about the importance of reflection.  In conclusion Currier notes, “Our jails and prison-houses are filled with men, who, had they stopt to reflect upon the crime they were about to commit, and the consequences that would result therefrom, might still be holding an honorable rank among men, living a useful and a happy life” (38).

P. 38-39: “The Vision of Life” by E. Kidder, Appleton Corporation.  Religious ballad.  The speaker admonishes youth to “Prepare! Prepare! Thy footsteps tend / To unseen worlds; – then upward bend / Thy willing soul, – and life shall be / A vision of eternity” (39).

P. 40-47: “Extracts from a Journal.” At her parents’ request, a factory woman has written these journal entries recounting her “first impressions of Lowell.”  She describes her boardinghouse, her companions, the Lowell streets and churches, the various rooms in the mill, the hospital, and the cemetery.

P. 47-48: “The Voice of the Past” by J.S.W., Boott Corporation [Jane S. Welch].  Essay.  The narrator argues that the voice of the past is “intimately . . . connected with our present happiness, and how important to make a proper use of the present, is its voice of monition and warning” (47-48).

P. 48: “Invitation to Writers” by Ed. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  “We extend our cordial invitation to the former contributors of the Lowell Offering, wherever they may be, to unite with us in the New England Offering.  Nor would we confine our invitation to former writers, but extend it to all who are or have been factory operatives, whether previous contributors or not: reserving of course the editorial right and necessity to judge of the fitness of every offered contribution.”
 
 

New Series, No. 1 (April 1848), p. 1-24
 

Cover i: The New England Offering: Written by Females Who Are or Have Been Factory Operatives.  Harriet Farley, Editor.  Published by T.W. Harris, 23 Central Street, Lowell.  Terms: One dollar a year, in advance.

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell, and the Union Bookstore, 39 Central Street, Lowell

Facing p. 1: Engraving of the “Merrimack Mills and Boarding-Houses (Lowell)” by O. Pelton.

P. 1: “Introductory Remarks” by Harriet Farley [m. John I. Donlevy].  Farley contends that The New England Offering’s “pretensions are but slight, and its principal claim upon the public is the fact that it emanates from the female manufacturing operatives of New England.”  She hopes that it will provide “improvement and amusement.”  “We trust that all contributors will unite with us in preserving a calm, candid, charitable spirit in their compositions, and feel free to speak in this manner of what they please.”  She wishes to make the periodical “eminently New England in its tone.”

P. 2-6: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of Lights and Shadows of Factory Life, Manchester, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  Cate begins by representing a fictitious character, a farmer, Colonel Bartlett, who see in the factory system nothing but wrong and oppression.  Although the narrator also “dislike[s] heartily the long-hour system in families and in corporations,” she has “a joyful faith in corporations, which Colonel Bartlett has not.”  She believes that “a greater part” of “the diseases and inconveniences of factory communities” are caused by the operatives’ neglect of their own health (3).  She therefore proceeds to counsel factory women on “habits of diet and exercise” (4).

P. 6: “Song” by H.J.H., Boott Corporation [Harriet Jane Hanson (m. William S. Robinson)].  Ballad expressing the sadness of waiting for a “Lost one.”

P. 7: “Prose Poems” by L. Larcom, Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Two prose poems entitled, “The Child and the Fireflies” and “A Lesson of Autumn.”  Nature teaches us lessons, and her beauties suggest those of Heaven.  Harriet H. Robinson noted that “these poems were written while L.L. was teaching a district school not far from the Mississippi.” 

P. 8: “Fancies” by M.F. Foley, Boston [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)].  Ballad.  The speaker longs for her childhood home and friends.

P. 8: “Visit to Weyer’s Cave,” Letter from Virginia [by Rachel Hayes].  Brief prose composition.  Nature draws the author closer to God.

P. 9-10: “The Sorrows of Simon” by “Charity Dawson,” Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Serial humorous fiction about a poor bachelor, Simon, who seeks to marry a rich young woman.

P. 10: “The Aged Peasant” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad translated from the German.

P. 11-12: “Nature’s Nobility” by M.A. Dodge, Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Essay considering why “so many of those who have won Fame’s brightest wreaths, are of low and obscure origin” (11).

P. 12: “The Mission of Hope” by Sabra, Merrimack Corporation [Sabra Wright].  Essay.  The narrator concludes, “I will love thee, bright Hope, beautiful harbinger of the future.”

P. 13-14: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 14: “Living Single,” Extract from a letter [by Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  The author considers her future as an old maid.  She avers that she “will never get married to get rid of the odium of old-maidship, nor to get a husband, nor to get a home.”

P. 15: “The Honeysuckle” by Adaline H. Winship, Eagletown, Arkansas [m. David H. Winship]. Nature poem.  Flowers teach us to trust in God.

P. 16-18: “A Night of Suspense” by “Ruth Rover,” Looking-Glass Prairie [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)]. Historical essay about an old settler of Illinois.  Religious message.

P. 18: “The Prairie,” Letter from Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Brief nature description.

P. 19: “Will He Set the Slave Free” by S.E. Martin, Ballard Vale [Sarah Elizabeth Martin, Hooksett, NH].  Anti-slavery ballad.

P. 19: “Be Courteous to Strangers,” Letter from Virginia [by Rachel Hayes].  Brief commentary on the cordiality of Southerners. 

P. 20-21: “My First Love” by “Zepherina Malvina Georgiana Lucretia Stubs,” Merrimack Corporation.  Humorous fiction.

P. 22-24: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley reviews several books and periodicals, including Hans Christian Andersen’s True Story of My Life, Domestic Sketches by Abba A. Goddard (a former Lowell worker), and L’Atelier (Paris).  She contends that Goddard’s book shows “a strong sympathy for the poor and oppressed” (23).  She lists the first names of some New England Offering writers: Rachel [Hayes], Maria [Currier], Sabra [Wright], Lorenza [Haynes], Sarah [Shedd], Martha Ann [Dodge], Eliza Jane [Cate], Lucy [Larcom], Lydia [Hall], and Harriette [Hanson].  Farley reflects on the recent death of John Quincy Adams and the opening of the new Carpet Mill.

P. 24: “Song for the Picnic” by Lucy Larcom [n.m.].  This “song, written by Miss Larcom, lately of the Lawrence Corporation, in this city, but now in Illinois,” was presented to the Committee of Arrangements for the Carpet Mill picnic.

Cover iii: Advertisements for the businesses of John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell; Elijah B. Gill, 130 Merrimack Street, Lowell; and W.H. Waldron, 61 Merrimack Street, Lowell

Cover iv: Prospectus of The New England Offering by Harriet Farley, Editor [m. John I. Donlevy].  “The patronage and sympathy of female manufacturing operatives is solicited for the New England Offering; a work devoted to their interests, and depending upon their support.  The aim of its conductors will be to promote, in every possible way, the highest welfare of manufacturing laborers; . . . Our appeal is to those who should support us, if for no other reasons than their interest in ‘the cultivation of humanity’ and the maintenance of true democracy.  There is little else of which we, as a people, can be proud. . . . Let us look upon our ‘free suffrage’ -- our lyceums -- our common schools -- our mechanics’ literary associations, the Periodical of our laboring females, -- upon all that is indigenous to our Republic, and say, with the spirit of the Roman Cornelia, ‘These, these are our jewels!’”

 Some comments by the publisher, T.W. Harris, are also included.  He writes: “THE PUBLISHER embraces the first opportunity to say to the girls -- to whom he looks mainly for encouragement and support -- that he intends to devote himself entirely to the interests of the Offering; and thus, as he hopes to prove, to their welfare. . . . [H]e appeals confidently to the female operative for that kindness and co-operation which distinguishes woman, and which he believes to be all that is wanting to secure to New England women a high rank in literature, and to the proprietors a due reward.”
 
 

New Series, No. 2 (May 1848), p. 25-48
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell, and John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell

Facing p. 25: Engraving, “The Market Wagon.”

P. 25: “The Market Wagon,” Pawtucket Falls [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad.

P. 26-28: “The Factories of Lowell, and the Factory Girls” by the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Manchester, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting a virtuous factory girl, Alice Means, and a vain, impetuous one, Caroline Walker. 

P. 28-31: “A Peep through the Gate of Matrimony” by L.A. Choate, Church Street, Lowell [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Allegory about marriage.

P. 32-33: “Elisha and the Angels” by L. Larcom [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Religious poem.

P. 34-36: “The Censorious” by M.A. Dodge, Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Light essay on women’s tendency to find fault with one another.

P. 36: “On the Death of a Youthful Friend” by S. Shedd, Boott Corporation [Sarah Shedd (n.m.)].  Poem elegizing Hon. Carroll D. Wright, Shedd’s early teacher.

P. 37-39: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 39: “The Evening Prayer” by E.W. Jennings, Middlesex Corporation [Eliza W. Jennings (n.m.)].  Religious ballad.

P. 40-41: “Kindness Versus Plainness of Speech” by Eliza J[ane] Cate, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Didactic essay.

P. 41: “Birthday Reflections” by J.L. Baker, Middlesex Corporation [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Brief personal essay.

P. 42: “The Mexican War” by Adaline H. Winship, Eagletown, Arkansas [m. David H. Winship].  Antiwar ballad.

P. 43: “The Sorrows of Simon” by “Charity Dawson,” Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Serial humorous fiction about a poor bachelor, Simon, who seeks to marry a rich young woman.

P. 44: “Imitation of Burns” by M.R. Green, Haverhill, Massachusetts [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Ballad in Scottish dialect.

P. 45-47: “The Little Orange-Girl” by “Eloisa Martlett,” Boott Corporation.  Serial fiction about a poor family, with observations on class bias.

P. 48: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses politics in France and then the need for reforms in Lowell.  She contends that The New England Offering would support reforms of  “[t]he long hour, the close work-room, the crowded chamber . . . if it lay alone with us to effect a change.”  She asserts that they are “subject to no other restraint” than a concern “that we might not speak wisely.”

Cover iii: Advertisements for J.C. Ayer, Lowell, and W.H. Waldron, 61 Merrimack Street, Lowell.  Notices: “To Readers, Writers, &c” 

Cover iv: Prospectus of The New England Offering.
 
 

New Series, No. 3 (June 1848), p. 49-72
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

Facing p. 49: Engraving, “Sunset.”

P. 49: “Sunset,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Nature poem.

P. 50-53: “Spirit Communion” by L.A. Choate, Church St., Lowell [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Serial fiction about a poor young seamstress, Fanny Wyman, who believes in spirit communion, “the idea that those whom we love return our affections in the general sympathy of the human race”(52-53).

P. 53: “The French,” Letter from W----, Massachusetts.  Brief commentary about the people of France.

P. 54-58: “The Factories of Lowell, and the Factory Girls” by the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Manchester, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].”  Serial didactic fiction contrasting a virtuous factory girl, Alice Means, and a vain, impetuous one, Caroline Walker.

P. 58: “My Grave” by M. Bryant, Merrimack Corporation.  Ballad.  The speaker asks, “Bury me in some shady dell, / Some quiet spot I crave.”

P. 59: “The Sea” by L. Larcom, Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature poem.  The speaker is homesick for her distant home near the ocean.

P. 60: “The Blue Devils” by H. Farley, Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Allegorical essay about human afflictions.

P. 61-64: “A Schoolmistress’s First Day” by “Ruth Rover,” Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Humorous autobiographical essay.

P. 64-65: “The Captive’s Release” by Ellen L. Smith [m. Hilburn], North Adams, Massachusetts.  Anti-slavery poem.

P. 65-66: “Leap-Year” by Maria, Wentworth, New Hampshire [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Humorous ficiton.

P. 66: “How much easier . . .” by S.  Brief commentary.

P. 67-68: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 68: “June” by “Ellen Chantry,” Boston [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)?].  Nature poem.

P. 69-70: “The Sorrows of Simon” by “Charity Dawson,” Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Serial humorous fiction about a poor bachelor, Simon, who seeks to marry a rich young woman.

P. 70: “Keeping School,” Letter from a Southern state.  Brief commentary about school teaching.

P. 71-72: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley comments on the use of the term “the wage-slave of the north” to describe the mill worker, an “expression, which is becoming common among a certain class of newspaper writers.”  She contends that this kind of rhetoric “detracts from the dignity of the laborer, and lessens his abhorrence of the condition of the slave” (71).  She gives the example of an illiterate Irish factory girl who is sending fifty dollars to her parents in Ireland.  “But the person, who cannot perceive the broad distinction between them and slaves, is not worthy of liberty” (72).  She discusses two recently published novels, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronté and Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens.

Cover iii: Advertisements for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell, and W.H. Waldron, 61 Merrimack Street, Lowell.  List of local agents for The New England Offering

Cover iv: “The Publisher to His Friends” by T.W. Harris.  Harris relates that he has just returned from visiting “some of the many manufacturing towns of Massachusetts,” bringing back a list of subscribers as well as “some choice specimens of prose and verse from new female contributors.”  Once the periodical has developed a healthy subscription list, they will “see and report the good or evil that attaches to the Factory System.”  “We have at present no ‘awful disclosures’ of corporation or factory iniquity in reserve, leading us to speak thus frankly, but we wish to have it distinctly understood by all the world, that we shall speak the truth fearlessly . . . whether what we say goes for or against either the capitalist or the operative.”
 
 

New Series, No. 4 (July 1848), p. 73-96
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell

Facing p. 73: Engraving, “Italian Peasant Girls.”

P. 73: “Italian Peasant Girls,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Poem. 

P. 74-78: “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian, Eagletown, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Serial travel narrative.

p. 78: “Prayer” by H.J.H., Boott Corporation [Harriet Jane Hanson (m. William S. Robinson)].  Religious poem.

P. 79-81: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Manchester, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The narrator advises factory women on diet and exercise.

P. 81-82: “A Familiar Letter” from “Ruth Rover,” Alton, Illinois, March 25, 1848 [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Larcom describes some of her Illinois travels.

P. 83-84: “Death of Napoleon” by M.A. Dodge, Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Poem.

P. 85: “The Old Farm-House” by Nancy R. Rainey, Cabot Corporation, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Regionalist sketch.

P. 86-87: “The Sorrows of Simon” by “Charity Dawson,” Middlesex Corporation [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Serial humorous fiction about a poor bachelor, Simon, who seeks to marry a rich young woman.

P. 87: “To Harriet” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad expressing sadness at parting from her friend.

P. 88-92: “Spirit Communion [Concluded]” by L.A. Choate, Church Street, Lowell [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Serial fiction about a poor young seamstress, Fanny Wyman, who believes in spirit communion, “the idea that those whom we love return our affections in the general sympathy of the human race” (52-53).

P. 92: “Fishersville” by E.J.C. [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Brief description of this New Hampshire town with its “two granite mills.”

P. 93-94: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 94: “Song of the Chicopee” by Jane B. Hamilton, Dwight Corporation, Chicopee, Massachusetts (m. Nathan F. Wilson).  Nature ballad urging the reader to cultivate contentment and cheerfulness.

P. 95-96: “Editor’s Table” by Harriet Farley [m. John I. Donlevy].  Farley explains that the Offering hopes to “inculcate a calm and dignified demeanor in all mill girls,” because “[a] continual grumbling and whining are, to say the least, in shocking bad taste; and a constant abuse of those from whom one is voluntarily receiving the means of subsistence, seems also to be something more than bad taste” (95).  She suggests that dissatisfied workers leave the mills, as some operatives have done, becoming teachers and missionaries.  “Miss R. [Nancy R. Rainey] was with us an operative in Lowell.  She earned money in the mill to clothe and carry herself to Ohio, where she became a successful teacher, and, after some years of usefulness, was recently married to a merchant there.  Miss B. [Sarah G. Bagley (m. James Durno) Emeline Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)??] was also an operative at our side; and she, in the same way, took for her motto, ‘Westward Ho!’ and, after a short but successful career as a teacher, was married to a clergyman. . . . Miss H. [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)], Miss T. [Laura Tay (m. Joseph LaBelle)], Miss L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)], and Miss G. [Abba A. Goddard (m. John Parke Rutherford)], are still active and successful teachers out of New England, and have all been of our clique of contributors.  Three, if not four of these, educated themselves while at work in the factory, or with the avails of mill labor.  Miss B. [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)], now at one of the Normal Schools of this State, prepared herself to receive its advantages, on one of the corporations of Lowell . . . Two of our contributors [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam) and Adaline H. Winship (m. David H. Winship)] date from a missionary seminary among the ‘Choctaw Nation’ (95) . . . the ‘first poetess’ of the ‘Offering’” [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)] (96).  Farley observes that the demise of The New Era of Industry (a later title of the Voice of Industry) “seems to be succeeded by an era of apathy” (96).

Cover iii: Advertisements for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell, and Nathan F. Merrill, Manchester, New Hampshire.  List of local agents

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Harris reports on his two weeks of visiting “mill girls” in New Hampshire and Maine.  He wishes that ten hours a day “might satisfy all parties” connected with the mills, but “every overseer and girl in the New England mills knows perfectly well . . . that the majority if not the whole body of the weavers and spinners prefer to work just as long as they can!”  He remarks that New Hampshire has recently passed a ten-hour law.
 
 

New Series, No. 5 (August 1848), p. 97-120
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

Facing p. 97: Engraving, “Wigwam in the Forest.”

P. 97-100: “The Wounded Dove. An Indian Tale” by “Ruth Rover” [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].

P. 100: “The Wind” by “Ellen Chantry,” Boston [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)?].  Ballad.  The speaker asks the wind to “cease thy wailing.”

P. 101-05: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life” [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)]. Serial didactic essay.  In this installment, the author discusses “Our Duties – Channing on the Laboring Classes – Dignity and Uses of Labor – Means of Improvement – Reading – Diffusiveness of Kindness – Treatment of the Unhappy, of the Erring, of the Ignorant.”

P. 106-07: “My Palm-Leaf Fan. Written on a Sick-Bed” by L.A. Choate [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Ballad.  The speaker expresses appreciation for the fan that soothed her through “tedious hours of restlessness, / Of lingering, withering pain” (107).

P. 107: “The Gnarled Tree,” Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Brief prose description.

P. 108: “Jairus’s Daughter” by J.S.W., Boott Corporation [Jane S. Welch].  Biblically-based historical sketch.

P. 109-112: “Pentucket” by M.R. Green [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Serial historical essay about the early history of Pentucket (now Haverhill, Massachusetts).

P. 113-16: “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian, Eagletown, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)]. Serial travel narrative.

P. 116: “Tete-a-Tete of the Milkmaids” by “Angelina Abigail,” Vine Lodge, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Humorous ballad.
 

P. 117-18: “A Morning’s Ramble” by Maria, Wentworth, New Hampshire [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  New Hampshire nature sketch.

P. 118: “A Sketch” by L[evinda]E. Leavitt, Salmon Falls, New Hampshire.  A mill weaver’s dream vision.

P. 119: “The Mountain Boy’s Song. From the German.” by L.L., Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad.

P. 119: “The Mother’s Prayer” by J.L. Baker, Middlesex Corporation [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Ballad.  A mother’s prayer over her deceased baby.

P. 120: “Editor’s Table. Independence Day” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley describes July Fourth festivities in Lowell.  Many mill women march in “The Temperance Procession.”  Farley is pleased to have witnessed “not one instance of intoxication” all day.

Cover iii: Advertisements for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell, and Nathan F. Merrill, Manchester, New Hampshire.  List of local agents.

Cover iv: Publisher’s Record by T. W. Harris.  Harris mentions his recent visits to Massachusetts mill towns.  New England women “prove that virtue, intelligence, industry, and piety are the bases on which rest the certain perpetuity of free institutions.”  Includes remarks “To Our Correspondents” and “To Capitalists.”
 
 

New Series, No. 6 (September 1848), p. 121-144
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

Facing p. 121: Engraving, “Hawaiian Girl.”

P. 121: “Hawaiian Girl’s Appeal” by Ed. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Poem recounting a dialogue between an Hawaiian girl and a “missionary maid.”  The Hawaiian girl notes the missionary’s “lofty brow”“ that “[i]s white and fair.”

P. 122-25: “The Little Orange-Girl [Concluded]” by Eloisa.  Serial fiction about a poor family, with commentary on class bias.

P. 125: “Come, Sweet Robin” by Caroline, South Adams.  Nature ballad.

P. 126: “Farewell to New England” by L. Larcom [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad composed as Larcom was leaving Lowell for Illinois.

P. 127-28: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life” [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The topics of this installment are Simplicity of Dress and Treatment of Hostess (i.e., the boardinghouse keeper).

P. 129-30: “The Sorrows of Simon” by “Charity Dawson” [Martha Ann Dodge (m. Rev. Allen H. Brown?)].  Serial humorous fiction about a poor bachelor, Simon, who seeks to marry a rich young woman.

P. 130-31: “Lines, Suggested by the Recent Lecture Delivered in Lowell, by the Celebrated Author of ‘The Raven,’ and Other Marvellous Effusions,” Lowell, August, 1848.  Balladic tribute to Edgar Allan Poe composed in Scottish dialect.

P. 132: “Prose Poems” by L. Larcom, Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Two prose nature poems, “The Web in the Path” and “The Whippoorwill.”

P. 133: “Good-by to New England” by L.S. Hall, Eagletown, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad about Hall’s departure for missionary work among the Choctaws.  The final stanza: “Good-by – I go to culture / Flowers of immortal bloom; / I leave thee sadly, gladly, / My dearer, dearest home.”

P. 134-37: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 137: “Address to New England” by A.H. Winship, Eagletown, Arkansas [Adaline H. Winship (m. David H. Winship)].  Ballad.

P. 138-39: “The Consumptive” by Anna, Cabot Corporation, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Sketch of the death of the author’s friend Alice in northern Vermont.

P. 139: “Virginia and New England” by R., extract from a letter [Rachel Hayes, “who went west with Lucy Larcom to meet her future husband”–H.H.R.]

P. 140-42: “Pentucket” by M.R. Green [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Serial historical essay about the early history of Pentucket (now Haverhill, Massachusetts).

P. 143-44 “Editor’s Table” by Harriet Farley [m. John I. Donlevy].  The subjects include New England, What’s in a Name?, and book notices.  Regarding the names of Offering writers, Farley observes, “When we commenced this publication, it was our wish to give the real name as the signature of each writer; but very few were willing to submit to this” (143).  She also defends their publication of anti-slavery viewpoints.

Cover iii: Advertisements for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell, and Nathan F. Merrill, Manchester, New Hampshire.  List of local agents, including Rev. S. Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Rev. Stephen Farley, Harriet Farley’s father].

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T. W. Harris.  Harris comments that they have added to their subscription list while traveling through factory villages of Connecticut, Rhode Island, other New England states.  “[W]e believe the Lowell girls to have the advantage, in most respects, over those in other places.”  But he believes they should have more Lowell subscriptions.  “The question, therefore, girls, is not, or should not be, Which will afford me the greater pleasure some leisure evening, the Offering or the mere Romance, -- but which will prove most instructive and useful to me and my mill companions in the work of self-improvement and moral elevation.”
 
 

New Series, No. 7 (October 1848), p. 145-168
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

Facing p. 145: Engraving, “Waikiki Bay, Oahu.”

P. 145: “Death of the Missionary Maid” by Ed. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad recounting a female missionary’s death in Hawaii.

P. 146-49: “Little Richie and the Gossamer” by “Jennie,” Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Didactic essay contending that “the human heart is so constituted as never to be satisfied with that which is not, like itself, immortal and heaven-born” (149).

P. 149: “What I Love” by J[ane] B. Hamilton, Dwight Corporation, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Ballad.  The speaker reads “from Nature’s book” and is “led to look / From Nature to its God above.”

P. 150-52: “Epistolary Extracts from Familiar Letters” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Extracts from letters describing Larcom’s Illinois experiences.

P. 152: “A Serenade” by A.E. Wilson, St. Louis, Missouri [Anna Elizabeth Holman (m. Wilson)].  Humorous ballad.

P. 153-54: “Letter to a Friend” by A.M.J., Chicopee, Massachusetts.  The author counsels her friend who is considering becoming a factory worker.

P. 154: “South Berwick.”  Brief commentary about this Maine town.

P. 155: “The Wave” by E.L. Smith, South Adams, Massachusetts [Ellen L. Smith (m. Hilburn)].  Nature ballad.

P. 156: “A Leaf from my Journal” by Maria, Wentworth, New Hampshire [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Diary extract on nature’s beauties.

P. 156: “We receive our books seasonably . . .” Berwick, Maine.  Extract from correspondence.

P. 157-59:  “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Serial travel narrative.

P. 159: “The Lone Bird” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad.

P. 160-63: “Pentucket” by M.R. Green, Haverhill, Massachusetts, 1841 [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Serial historical essay about the early history of Pentucket (now Haverhill, Massachusetts).  Includes several poems dated 1841.

P. 163: “The Ocean” by Anna, Dunstable Springs, [Massachusetts?].  Brief nature reflection with a religious theme.

P. 164-65: “Be Kind” by Emma, South Berwick, Maine. Didactic essay.

P. 165: “Practical Thoughts” by L.R.M., Merrimack Corporation.  Brief commentary stressing the importance of “[a] cool head, an investigating mind, a warm heart, and diligent hands, with benevolence and honesty, piety and perseverance.”

P. 166-68: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses the famous statue, “The Greek Slave,” by Hiram Powers.  She “see[s] much of sentiment in the Slave,” but the statue’s “hand . . . is the hand of a child, not of a woman; not of such a woman.”  She also contends that “[t]he statue would have pleased more generally, had it been draped” (167).  Under “Book Notices,” Farley discusses several books including Fredrika Bremer’s Brothers and Sisters and Anne Brontë’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.

Cover iii: Advertisements for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell, and Nathan F. Merrill, Manchester, New Hampshire.  “Travelling Agents” by T.W. Harris.

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Regarding the poor financial circumstances of the Offering (referring to both the Lowell Offering and The New England Offering), Harris wrote, “The Offering has already changed hands four times since its commencement, from the inadequate support afforded to its proprietors.  In fact, much money has been lost in the attempt to sustain it.”  He appeals to factory women for more support.  List of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father] and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].
 
 

New Series, No. 8 (November 1848), p. 169-192
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

P. 169: “Corrilla” by Ed. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Poem.

P. 170: “Prose Poems” by L. Larcom, Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Two nature poems, “The Rose-Bud’s Death” and “The Rose on the Rock.”

P. 171-73: “Letter from Mount Washington House” by J.L.B., White Mountains, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Baker’s letter to Harriet Farley describing her travels in the White Mountains.

P. 173: “Ode to Gentleness” by Enad, Merrimack Corporation [Miss Lane].  Poem.  The speaker asks that gentleness “[b]e thou through life our constant friend.” 

P. 174-75: “A Leaf from Real Life” by Adaline H. Winship, Eagletown, Arkansas [m. David H. Winship].  Narrative poem recounting the experience of a family stricken by death and separation.

P. 176-79: “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian, Eagletown, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Serial travel narrative.

P. 179: “Lowell” by L.D.  Brief comments expressing appreciation for The New England Offering.

P. 180: “To a Friend,” Boston [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)?].  Ballad expressing the speaker’s wish to see her friend.

P. 180: “A Fragment” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Poem stressing the importance of forgiveness.

P. 181-86: “The Stranger” by “Emma Jane Clement,” Manchester, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)?].  Sensational fiction.

P. 186: “The Prisoner” by Lurenda, Salmon Falls, New Hampshire [Miss Lane].  Ballad.

P. 187-88: “Memories of the Past” by “Grace Gayfeather,” Lowell [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)?].  Humorous sketch of schoolgirl experiences.

P. 188: “The more I see of factory life . . .” by J.L.B. [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Brief complaint about long working hours and lack of “time for self-improvement.”  Baker comments, “It is utterly impossible, after working from five in the morning till seven at night, to apply the mind to anything that requires much of thought.”  Yet, she knows there are women who would work more hours “if they could.”

P. 189-91: “Sequel to Pentucket” by M.R. Green, Haverhill [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Sequel to a serial historical essay about the early history of Pentucket (now Haverhill, Massachusetts).  Includes several passages of poetry.

P. 192: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley reviews two books.  The Rev. Daniel C. Eddy’s Lectures to Young Ladies “misrepresents Lowell and many of its classes of inhabitants.”  Benjamin P. Poore’s The Rise and Fall of Louis Philippe “has been read with much pleasure.”

Cover iii: Advertisement for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell.  List of local agents, including Rev. S. Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Rev. Stephen Farley, Harriet Farley’s father] and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Harris pleads for at least 10,000 subscribers to come forward among the “50,000 mill girls in New England.”  “We are in want of money.”
 
 

New Series, No. 9 (December 1848), p. 193-216
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

P. 193-97: “Love Passages in the Life of an Old Maid” by J.L.B., Manchester, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Romance fiction.  A woman recounts the failed courtship experiences that have left her “an old maid.”

P. 197: “The Old Tree by the Schoolhouse” by L.L., Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature ballad.

P. 198-99: “A Contrast” by Caroline [M.] Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Dream vision poem.

P. 199: “Ingratitude” by L.E.L. [Levinda E. Leavitt].  Brief essay.

P. 200-02: “My First Visit to Boston” by Enad, Merrimack Corporation [Miss Lane].  Travel narrative.

P. 202: “Home of My Childhood” by Nancy R. Rainey, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Ballad expressing nostalgia for the humble cottage that was the speaker’s childhood home.

P. 203-04: “Our Town: How It Looked” by Betsey, Lowell [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Autobiographically-based regionalist sketch.

P. 204: “To the Sun” by Enad [Miss Lane].  Ballad.

P. 205-11:  “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian, Eagletown, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Serial travel narrative.  Includes some observations of Native Americans, including Cherokees, Choctaws, and Creeks.

P. 212: “The Love of the Aged” by L.L., Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad.

P. 212: “Hope” by L.M.R., Boott Corporation.  Brief essay.

P. 213: “The Voice of Nature” by Estelle [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)]. Brief essay.  Nature calls us “to reverence her God.”

P. 213: “Still Hope On” by S.E.T.  Ballad.  Religious theme.

P. 214: “My Brother” by Ellen L. Smith [m. Hilburn], South Adams, Massachusetts.  Poem elegizing the speaker’s brother.

P. 214: “I Would Like to Marry” by L.R.M., Merrimack Corporation. Ballad.  The speaker wishes to marry a “noble-hearted gentleman,” who is “An honest man, with an honest heart.”

P. 215-16: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley considers the “love of flowers” which “is generally considered a test and token of refinement.”  That factory operatives cultivate many plants in the mills serves as “an indication of taste and purity of character” (215).  Farley announces that The New England Offering will henceforth open its pages to contributions from all female workers, not just those in the mills.

Cover iii: Advertisement for John W. Davis, 5 John Street, Lowell.  List of local agents, including Rev. S. Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Rev. Stephen Farley, Harriet Farley’s father] and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Harris reports on his visits to Fall River, Massachusetts, and to Rhode Island mills.  He reflects on the conflict between Yankee workers and newly arrived European immigrants.  Due to competition in manufacturing, New England mill owners are lowering wages, which has prompted many women to leave the mills.  He urges them to “[b]e governed by discretion” and to “fly” only if they “can better [their] condition by flight.”
 
 

Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1849), p. 1-24
 

Cover i: The New England Offering: A Magazine of Industry. Written by Females Who Live by Their Labor

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

P. 1: “Introductory” by Ed. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  In this new volume, which expands its contributors and readers to include all working women, Farley hopes to show that the lady’s “refinement, accomplishments, and intellectual cultivation . . . are shared in a degree by their toiling sisters of the needle, shears, and loom.”  She advises working women, “We must still be intelligent, virtuous, and discreet, if we would still be respected.”  She welcomes “articles upon any subject.” 

P. 2-5: “Aunt Deborah and Her Protege” by Helen [Helen E. Smith].  Serial domestic fiction.

P. 5: “The Lady and the Maid” by L.L., Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad showing that “The love of the beautiful may unfold / In the soul of the humblest creature.”

P. 6-7: “A Dialogue between My Rug and Me. Gratefully Inscribed to A[lexander] Wright, Esq.” by Adelaide, Choctaw Mission, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Part-humorous poem.  Religious theme.

P. 8-10: “A Prairie-Race” by “Ruth Rover” [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Regionalist sketch.

P. 11: “Song.”  Love ballad.

P. 12-14: “Melvina Howard” by J.L.B., Hooksett, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Serial sensational fiction.  Includes some passages of poetry.

P. 14-15: “The Meadow Grass. A New Hampshire Tale.”  Regionalist sketch.  A mother and children braid straw to educate several of the sons.

P. 16-17: “Invocation to the Muse” by M.R. Green, Haverhill, Massachusetts [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Humorous ballad.

P. 17-18: “Aunt Charity” by J.M.M.  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.  Aunt Charity works in the small village’s mills.  Unmarried, she possesses “quiet self-respect and independence” (18).

P. 19-20: “‘Look into Thy Heart and Write’” by Flora, Nashua, New Hampshire.  Didactic essay.

P. 20: “The Broken-Hearted” by Rebecca, Bangor, Maine.  Ballad.  The speaker asks to be placed in her grave, forgotten by all but her mother.

P. 21-23: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 23: “Lines to Nora” by Ellen L. Smith [m. Hilburn], South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad.  The speaker “yearn[s] to find the deep repose and quiet of the tomb.”

P. 24: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)]. Farley favorably reviews two books, Poems by Anne C. Lynch and The Women of the Revolution by Elizabeth Ellet.

Cover iii: “Hudson’s Panorama of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Brief description of this panorama on display in Lowell.  List of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father] and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Harris relates that he has been “visiting the numerous mills in and around Kingston, Richmond, and Westerly, Rhode Island, and those in and near Norwich, Connecticut.”  He acknowledges workers’ oppression, contending that “intelligent laborers will have, eventually, a just reward.  They will oppose a barrier to the excessive claims of capital, that not even golden levers can overthrow.”  He appeals for written contributions from workers outside the mills and suggests some of the kinds of writings they might produce.
 
 

Vol. 1, No. 2 (February 1849), p. 25-48
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

P. 25: “To Readers and Correspondents” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley informs correspondents “that, as a general thing, we prefer short articles.”  She discusses The New England Offering’s purpose as follows: “While so many publications are earnestly endeavoring to convince society what may and can be done for laborers, we propose to ourselves the more lonely, but not less useful, task of teaching them, by precept and example, what they may and should do for themselves.” 

P. 26-29: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The subjects of this installment are Scandal, Ridicule, Use of Pet Words and Phrases, and Deportment in Public.

P. 29: “Oh! Why Do Mortals Fear to Die?” by S.K.  Religious ballad.

P. 30-31: “Imagination” by Matilda, Ontega Springs, Ohio.  Schoolgirl’s orientalist dream vision.

P. 32-33: “Pentucket” by M.R. Green [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Ballad about the moral decline of Haverhill, Massachusetts, since its founding.

P. 33-35:  “Melvina Howard” [by Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Serial sensational fiction.  Includes some passages of poetry.

P. 35: “Why is a man’s love . . .” Brief satiric observation.

P. 36: “Winter at Stockbridge” by Fannie.  Poem.

P. 37-38: “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Serial travel narrative.  Includes some information about Chickasaw and Choctaw Indians.

P. 38: “As fickle as a woman . . .” Brief commentary on the perception of female fickleness.

P. 39-42: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.

P. 42: “The Voice of Winter” by Jane B. Hamilton, Dwight Corporation, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Nature ballad.

P. 43-44: “Aunt Deborah and Her Protege” [by Helen E. Smith].  Serial domestic fiction.

P. 45: “New England Winter” by L.L., Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature ballad extolling the virtues of New England homes.

P. 46-47: “The Holidays” by H.F. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay about Thanksgiving Day, Christmas, and New Year’s Day, including a dream vision.

P. 48: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley reviews three books: The Haunted Man or the Ghost’s Bargain by Charles Dickens, The Housekeeper’s Receipt Book [Farmer’s Almanac and Housekeeper’s Receipt Book?] and Thoughts of a Lifetime [Verses of a Life Time?] by Caroline H. Gilman.

Cover iii: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Harris reports on his visits to Connecticut factory villages canvassing for subscriptions.  He comments on the struggle between Labor and Capital as follows: “[T]here needs to be a more general, a more thorough, a more practical education among the working classes.  Labor must compete with capital in intelligence.  And then, and never before, will Labor have and exercise a suggestive and a directive influence over Capital.”  He appeals for more subscribers.

Cover iv: “To Correspondents.”  List of local agents, including Rev. S. Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Rev. Stephen Farley, Harriet Farley’s father] and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].
 
 

Vol. 1, No. 3 (March 1849): p. 49-72
 

Cover ii: Advertisement for Merrill & Heywood, booksellers, 23 Central Street, Lowell.

P. 49: “Prose Poems” by L. Larcom [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Two prose poems, “The Boy and the Leaf” and “Flowers after Frost.”

P. 50-52: “The Spirit’s Conflict” by L.A.C., Lowell [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Religious fiction.

P. 52: “An Invitation. -- Dedicated to Maria” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad about friendship.

P. 53-56: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life” [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The topics of this installment are Deportment at Table, Anna G.’s Picture, and Treatment of Overseers.  Cate defends factory agents and overseers as men of good sense and virtue.  She portrays a vulgar, ill-natured mill girl, Anna G.  There is reference to prejudice against Irish immigrants. 

P. 57: “Good-Night” by Fannie.  Ballad.

P. 58-60: “Sketches of a Midsummer Excursion Seven Hundred Miles in the Southwest” by an Equestrian [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Conclusion of this serial travel narrative.  The narrator explains that “the Editress of the Offering asked for sketches of Western life, scenes, and manners” (60).

P. 60: “To Elsie” by Sarah, Hinckley, Ohio [Sarah M. Hough (m. Henry Holbrook)?].  Nostalgic ballad expressing wishes to see cousin Elsie and her parents’ “dear old cot [cottage].”

P. 61-63: “Roxy and Dorcas: or, All Faith and No Faith” by the Author of “Abby’s Year in Lowell,” Pawtucket Falls [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Conclusion of serial didactic fiction contrasting two heroines: happy, cheerful Roxy and sullen, fearful Dorcas.  When both begin working in the Lowell mills, Roxy is contented with conditions, while Dorcas becomes the leader of a workers’ organization protesting against a wage reduction.  Roxy’s virtue proves her superiority.  As Roxy dies, she tells Dorcas, “Love everybody” (63).

P. 64: “Lines to Miss Ruth Amidown” by “Ida St. Nicholas,” Southbridge, Massachusetts.  Ballad expressing condolence to her bereaved friend.  Religious theme.

P. 65-67: “Aunt Deborah and Her Protege” by Helen [Helen E. Smith]. Serial domestic fiction.

P. 67: “Life’s Dreams” by J.L. Baker, Manchester, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Ballad.  The speaker’s sublime dreams of her carefree childhood and of drinking “from wisdom’s gushing fount” contrast with her difficult waking life.

P. 68-70:  “Melvina Howard” by J.L.B., Hooksett, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Serial sensational fiction.

P. 70: “To a Friend” by Clarissa, Hopkinton, Rhode Island [Clara Moxon].  Ballad.  The speaker asks her friend to remember and pray for her.
 

P. 71-72: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley reports that The New England Offering has met assistance and patronage but also with “calumny, opposition, and efforts to injure ourself and our work.”  They have been called “‘milk-and-water,’ ‘tools of aristocrats,’ ‘cowards,’ ‘dupes,’ and other appellations of the sort” (71).  She comments on an article from the Cincinnati Daily Sunbeam expressing disbelief that factory women could afford to buy a piano.  The Cincinnati writer asks “what services, other than working in the factory, were rendered to the millionaire proprietors?” (71).  Farley responds by giving examples of factory women’s financial comfort.  She reviews The Artist’s Married Life; Being That of Albert Durer by Leopold Scheffer.

Cover iii: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris.  Harris mentions visiting the mills in Saco and Biddeford, Maine.  There he found that “a greater interest was taken in the Offering by the agents, clerks, and overseers.”  He regrets that “we have but comparatively few subscribers in Lowell.”  Yet he “feel[s] conscious of being engaged in a good cause in publishing the Offering.”

Cover iv: “To Agents and Subscribers” by T.W. Harris.  List of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father] and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].
 
 

Vol. 1, No. 4 (April 1849): p. 73-96
 

Cover i: Harriet Farley, editor and publisher.  Published at No. 23 Central Street.

Cover ii: Editor’s notes and extracts from correspondence.  Text of a letter sent by a young man looking for a wife.

P. 73: “To Our Subscribers” by H.F. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  “The past year has been one of struggle against adverse circumstances – the difficulties which beset all business adventurers – the blight resting upon manufacturing interests, and the cloud overshadowing all efforts and enterprises . . . Already has our publisher withdrawn from the work; and we must struggle alone, or the magazine be discontinued . . . But we will do what we can.  We will give reading which shall be inferior, in literary merit, to no other one dollar magazine; and superior in interest to those engaged in female manual employments.”

P. 74-76: “Epistolary Extracts from Familiar Letters” by “R.R.” [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  The author relates some of her experiences in her Illinois community.

P. 76: “An Acrostic” by L.A.C., Lowell [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Ballad expressing hopes for The New England Offering.  The speaker asks “all sister spirits in love to bind / New garlands, that through the heart will wind, / Giving strength and vigor to true effort combined.”

P. 77-78: “Life’s Changes” by R.G., Rockville, Connecticut [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Serial fiction about a rural farm family living near the Connecticut River and Mount Holyoke.

P. 78: “Memorial of My Mother” by “Myrtis Milwood,” Lawrence Corporation.  Ballad expressing sadness for the speaker’s mother’s death.

P. 79-82: “Aunt Deborah and Her Protege” by Helen [Helen E. Smith].  Serial domestic fiction.

P. 82: “Moonward Gushings” by “Angelina Abigail,” Vine Lodge, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Humorous ballad.

P. 83: “Immortality” by J.L. Baker, Hooksett, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Religious essay.

P. 83: “Death; – we call it only sleep . . .” Stanza of poetry.

P. 84: “Youth Is a Happy Period” by H.F.****, Appleton Street [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Brief essay.

P. 84: “The Flowers” by Lucy, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Ballad expressing sadness for the loss of friends.

P. 85-87: “Retrospective Glimpses of Recent Travel” by H.F. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley recounts her recent travels to Baltimore; Washington, D.C.; Alexandria, Virginia; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; and Paterson, New Jersey, where she visiting many mills.

P. 88: “Diary of a Stormy Evening” by Maria, Wentworth, New Hampshire [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Brief nature essay.

P. 88: “Lines Written on Seeing the Ruins of the Methodist Chapel, Burned February 13, 1849” by Ella Maria, South Berwick, Maine.  Ballad.

P. 89: “A Reverie” by Enad, Merrimack Corporation [Miss Lane].  Nature essay.

P. 90: “Lines on April” by E.W. Jennings, Lowell [Eliza W. Jennings (n.m.)].  Humorous ballad.

P. 90-91: “A Night in My Native Village” by “Grace Gayfeather,” Waltham [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)?].  Brief essay.

P. 91: “To the Offering” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad expressing appreciation for The New England Offering.  “I hail thee with gladness, / Thou fair little book . . . Heaven aid each endeavor / Of our sisterly class . . .”

P. 92: “Away with Care” by “Ida St. Nicholas,” Southbridge, Massachusetts.  Ballad.

P. 92-93: “Extracts from a Journal,” Lowell.  Serial prose.  The text is nearly the same as that published as “Extracts from a Journal: Friday evening” in the September, 1847, issue.  At her parents’ request, a factory woman has written these journal entries recounting her “first impressions of Lowell.”

P. 94: “Call Not Woman Weak” by Mary Jane M’Afee, Lebanon, New Hampshire [Mary Jane McAffee].  Ballad.

P. 94: “The Voice of Nature” by E.F.D., Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Brief essay explaining that “[n]ature is ever calling us . . . to reverence her God.”

P. 95-96: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Book notices and reviews for publications including John Greenleaf Whittier’s Poems and a new periodical, The Plough, the Anvil, and the Loom.

Cover iii-iv: “Publisher’s Record” by T.W. Harris. Harris describes his and Harriet Farley’s travels to Virginia, Maryland, and New York, visiting mills and canvassing for subscribers.  He will turn over the periodical’s publication to Farley.

Cover iv: List of local agents in six states (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maine, New Jersey), including E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)] and Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father].
 
 

Vol. 6, No. 5 (May 1849), p. 97-120
 

Cover ii: The text of a letter from a man seeking a wife in Lowell is reproduced.  Other notes.

P. 97: “To Readers” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley explains that she has “assumed the labors of publisher, with those of travelling agent, mail distributor, &c.”  She addresses the objection brought against the magazine that the publisher is trying “to get a living by it.”  She asserts this is true “the publisher of almost every other periodical.”

P. 98-101: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of Lights and Shadows of Factory Life. Manchester, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  Cate recalls her early, pleasant experience eight or ten years earlier working in the mills of Amoskeag, New Hampshire.  Then she discusses “Care of rooms in boarding-houses.”

P. 102-03: “The Watcher” by L.A.C., Lowell [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Poem about a young maiden betrayed by her lover.

P. 103: “Death” by Ellen, Lowell.  Brief essay beginning “What power is thine, O, Death, for joy or terror!”

P. 104-07: “Melvina Howard” [by Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Serial sensational fiction.

P. 107: “Spring” by E.W. Jennings, Hooksett, New Hampshire [Eliza W. Jennings (n.m.)].  Nature ballad.

P. 108: “Similitudes” by L. Larcom, Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Two brief prose compositions, “The Moon” and “Light on the Clouds.”

P. 109-110: “Address to a Young Friend” by M.R.G. [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Didactic ballad.  The speaker concludes by urging her friend to “Remember that a virtuous heart / Is sure of gaining Heaven.”

P. 110: “The Cholera.”  Brief prose composition.

P. 111-13: “Aunt Deborah and Her Protege” by Helen [Helen E. Smith].  Serial domestic fiction.

P. 114-15: “A Picture” by Ellen L. Smith [m. Hilburn], North Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad.

P. 115: “Lines” by Caroline [M.] Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad expressing longing for “Heaven’s own blissful shore.”

P. 116-18: “Life’s Changes” by Rebecca, Rockville, Connecticut [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Serial fiction about a rural farm family living near the Connecticut River and Mount Holyoke.  After many of them are lost to sickness and death, one “for the last few months . . . has spent her time within the noisy din of a factory’s walls.”  In conclusion, the narrator advises, “Be kind to all, and your life will be happy, and its end pleasant and peaceful” (118).

P. 118: “‘Perseverance conquers all obstacles’ . . .”  Brief commentary.

P. 119: “Our Mill” by L.M.T., Hopkinton, Rhode Island.  Ballad describing the Bethel Mill, where “The girls are all united / To labor heart and hand.”

P. 120: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  The editor briefly comments on publications received, including Poems by James T. Fields, the Lady’s Book, and Sartain’s Union Magazine.

Cover iii: “Publisher’s Record” by H.F. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley describes her recent visits to New Hampshire mill towns, including Manchester, Nashua, and Franklin (where she visited with Eliza Jane Cate).  She urges operatives to “pledge themselves to a generous effort in behalf of their own magazine.”

Cover iv: “A Note” by E.J. Cate [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Cate addresses her own “subscribers for the ‘New England Offering.’”  List of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and E.J. Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].
 
 

Vol. 7, No. 6 (June 1849), p. 121-44
 

Cover ii: Extracts from correspondence include a former mill operative’s letter quite critical of factory life.  As she writes, “During my brief and vexatious stay in the ‘city of spindles,’ (of eighteen months only) I truly pitied that class of females who had no other means of gaining a livelihood than watching machinery; and I must say I returned to Vermont not only with ill health, but ill thoughts pertaining to a mill, or mill life.  And though I may never again be ‘entangled in that yoke of bondage,’ yet the ‘Offering’ will long live in my memory.”

[Facing p. 121]: Engraving of the Massachusetts and Prescott Mills.

P. 121: “Engravings” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses her efforts to furnish engravings for the periodical.  She appeals for more written contributions.

P. 122-28: “Old Jew Barnard; and How He Lost His Heart, but Found a Substitute” by the editor [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial regionalist fiction about a stingy rich man who changes and becomes generous.

P. 128: “Kindred Spirits” by L.E.L., Salmon Falls, New Hampshire [Levinda E. Leavitt].  Brief essay.

P. 129-32: “Belshazzar’s Feast” by M.R. Green, Haverhill, Massachusetts [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Orientalist poem.

P. 132: “The Rose-Bud” by Clara, Hopkinton, Rhode Island [Clara Moxon].  Prose allegory about a baby’s death.

P. 133-35: “Duties and Rights of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  In this installment, Cate discusses the structure of the skin, bathing, and the bathing-rooms at Manchester, New Hampshire.

P. 136-39: “Aunt Deborah and Her Protege. [Concluded.]” by H.E.S., Lowell [Helen E. Smith].  Serial domestic fiction.  At the conclusion, Aunt Deborah exhorts her relatives “never to trample upon virtue and worth, though it was robed in the simple garb of poverty” (139).

P. 139: “A Scrap from the ‘Classics’” by “R.R.,” Hazel Academy, Sunset [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Humorous sketch of a school teacher’s experience.

P. 140-43: “A Week in New York” by the Editor [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Travel narrative.  Farley describes some of New York City’s churches, public buildings, and street scenes.

P. 143: “The Violets” by L. Larcom, Vine Lodge, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature ballad.

P. 144-cover iii: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses the widely publicized infanticide of her own baby committed by an eighteen-year-old Manchester, New Hampshire, factory girl, Letitia S. Blaisdell.  “Through the length and breadth of the land, it is known that this girl has committed a murder, and is condemned to die.  It is known, too, that she was a factory girl; was one of our New England operatives at the time of this dreadful deed . . . we will allow it to be horrible, shocking, terrible in one so young, and she a woman.”  People assume she had “become loose and immoral,” but Farley defends her.  She was in love, and needed money in order to marry, “that disgusting requisite to connubial aspirations, ‘the tin,’ which a woman is desired to bring to the altar.”  Farley hopes for Blaisdell’s reformation: “We should not fear to sit by her side, or even to share her bed” (144).

Among several book notices is one for Miss Leslie’s story “Professor Nimmons” in last month’s Godey’s Lady’s Book.  Farley objects to the story’s factory girl character, who is “one of the silliest pretenders to literary ability.”  She concludes, “As most of the literary pretension of the mill girls is embodied in the Offering, we quietly receive Miss Leslie’s hit” (iii).

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley mentions her recent visits to Amesbury and Newburyport, Massachusetts.  The list of local agents includes Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and Eliza Jane Cate [n.m.], Franklin, New Hampshire.
 
 

Vol. 7, No. 7 (July 1849), p. 145-68
 

Cover ii: “Exchanges” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Two letters are reproduced, one from a Southern gentleman quite critical of Northern factories (continued on cover iii).

P. 145: “Republicanism” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)?].  Brief essay arguing that “[w]e should be more American, more democratic.”  The author contends that The New England Offering “is purely American.”

P. 146-49: “Naked Truth” by “Grace Gayfeather,” Lowell [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)?].  Humorous allegorical fiction.

P.149: “Speak Not Harshly” by “Myrtis Milwood,” Lawrence Corporation, Lowell.  Didactic ballad.

P. 150-52: “Melvina Howard” by J.L. Baker [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Serial sensational fiction.

P. 153-58: “Rights and Duties of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The topic of this installment is “Reduction of Wages for Factory Labor.”  Cate concludes: “All who know the rates of wages in Lowell, Manchester, and other large manufacturing towns, know that there never has been a time when the girls have been earning so much as in the few years preceding the late reduction.  That they will earn as much again, and at no very distant period, I have no doubt.  To say nothing of the patriotism, the humanity of Abbott Lawrence, the Lowells, and others of our most influential capitalists, their self-interest alone must lead them to the adoption of such measures as will induce the better portion of our New England girls, the vigorous, the moral, and the intelligent, to resort to the mills as their place for gains” (158).

P. 158: “Churning Song” by “Angelina Abigail,” Vine Lodge, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad.

P. 158: “When the eagle’s wing flags . . .”  Stanza of poetry.

P. 159-60: “The Inauguration” by the Editor [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Brief sketch of a presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C.

P. 160: “Home” by Z.H., Manchester, New Hampshire.  Brief essay on the importance of home.

P. 160: “Why is it so often . . .” by L.  Couplet of poetry.

P. 161-62: “Our Mill at Laureldale” by Clara, Hopkinton, Rhode Island [Clara Moxon].  Ballad expressing a cheerful view of work in the mill of J. Wilcox and Co.  The speaker contends, “If you wish to find a happy band / And cheerful, do not fail, / If ever you should come this way, / To call at Laureldale” (161).

P. 162: “And is the effort crowning with success? . . .” Stanza of poetry.

P. 163-66: “Old Jew Barnard; and How He Lost His Way, but Found His Heart” by H.F., Lowell [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial regionalist fiction about a stingy rich man who changes and becomes generous.

P. 167-68: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley addresses “The Present Crisis” of manufactures and wages, as well as the observation that “our Lowell girls are degenerating.”  She reiterates Cate’s observation (see p. 156) that Irish immigrant women are “untidy, ignorant, and passionate” (167).  Several book notices follow.

Cover iii-iv: Continuation from cover ii of a letter from a Southern gentleman contending that Northern factory workers have a harder life than Southern slaves.  As he writes, “I have often wept bitter tears for the situation of the young ladies of the north who are compelled to work in the factories to such a great extent to build up fortunes for others.  It is well known that they are very subject to consumption . . .” (iii). 

Cover iv: The list of local agents includes Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and Eliza Jane Cate [n.m.], Franklin, New Hampshire.
 
 

Vol. 7, No. 8 (August 1849), p. 169-92
 

Cover ii: “Exchanges” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley lists and briefly comments upon the periodicals she receives.  Titles include The Plough, Loom, and Anvil, The Child’s Friend, and The Prisoner’s Friend.

P. 169: “A Prairie Pastoral” by L.L., Vine Lodge, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad appreciatively portraying “Sweet Kate of the prairie.”

P. 170-71: “Our Meeting-House” by M.R.G., Haverhill, Massachusetts, July, 1849 [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Prose sketch of a local church.

P. 171: “Consolation for the Friendless. From the German” by L.L., Woodburn, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Poetry.

P. 172-75: “The Unexpected Bridal” by L.A.C. [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Domestic fiction.

P. 176: “My Birth-Day” by Maria, Wentworth, New Hampshire [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Brief personal essay.

P. 176: “Lines” by Caroline M. Whitney.  Ballad.

P. 177: “A Mother’s Lament” by Mrs. Anna E. Wilson, St. Louis, Missouri [Anna Elizabeth Holman (m. Nathan F. Wilson)].  Poetry.  A mother’s elegy for her young deceased daughter.

P. 177: “Contemplation of the Heavenly Bodies” by Enad [Miss Lane].  Brief essay.  Religious message.

P. 178-80: Melvina Howard” by J.L. Baker [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Serial sensational fiction.

P. 180: “The Spell is O’er Me Now” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Poem.

P. 181-82: “Extracts from a Journal,” Lowell.  Serial prose.  In diary entries, a factory woman describes her early impressions of Lowell.  The text is nearly the same as a portion of that published under “Saturday evening” in “Extracts from a Journal” in the September, 1847, issue.

P. 182: “Where Shall Our Sister Sleep?” by P.H., Lawrence Corporation, Lowell.  Elegiac ballad about a woman’s death.  The speaker expresses hope that “white-winged seraphs [will] come, / Bear the freed spirit home, / Home to its God.

P. 183-86: “Our Town. No. 2. Our Meeting-House” [by Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Autobiographically-based regionalist sketch set in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire.  Humor.

P. 186-89: “The Little Washerwomen” by H., Lowell.  Regionalist sketch about two girlfriends.

P. 189: “Lines to a Friend on Leaving New England” by J.M.M., Lowell.  Ballad expressing regret for her friend’s departure.  The speaker advises the friend, “Think not in all that land to find, / A fountain rill, or lake, / Whose chrystal waves, divinely pure, / The thirst for gold can slake.”

P. 190: “Retrospective Glimpses of Recent Travel. The Ball and the President” by the Editor [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley describes her impressions of the recent Inauguration Ball in Washington, D.C.

P. 191-92: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses the Lowell Post Office.  She describes Lowell as “a city of females, at least a city whose wealth and prosperity has been greatly owing to females” (192).

Cover iii: Continuation of text from cover ii.  An extract from a letter written by J**** is reproduced.  Book notice of The Pictorial Lowell Almanac, for 1850.

Cover iv: “Publisher’s Record” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley addresses and briefly refutes “[t]he objections we occasionally meet with . . . but we have not room to do it in other than a laconic style.
       First: The work is in the interest of the employers.
       Read and see if it is.
       Second: It is not written by the mill-girls.
       Yes it is: by those who are, or have been, factory operatives.
       Third: It does not belong to us to support it more than to others.
       Yes it does: for its literature is prepared with a special aim at what will please, inform, or improve you.
       Fourth: If it is a good magazine for us, it is good enough for anybody.
       Very true: but for the answer given to the preceding question, it is better for you than for others. School-teachers, odd-fellows, temperance associations, artisans and other bodies, have their particular organs, and why should not the mill-girls have theirs, and if they have it, they should feel an interest in sustaining it.”
       The list of local agents includes Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and Eliza Jane Cate [n.m.], Franklin, New Hampshire.
 
 

Vol. 7, No. 9 (September 1849), p. 193-216
 

Cover ii: “Book Notice” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley favorably reviews Eliza Cook’s Journal (a British periodical), expressing hope for the appearance of an American equivalent.

The constitution of the Merrimack Division of the Mutual Improvement Circle (1841) is reproduced.

P. 193: “Girlhood” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad.  The speaker exhorts girls to “Be happy, and be pure! / For Purity’s white plumes are charmed / Against the tempter’s lure.”

P. 194-96: “Rights and Duties of Mill Girls.” By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life,” Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The subjects of this installment are “Mary and Anna” and “Elevation of Mind versus Outward Display.”  Cate shows the moral dangers of some factory women’s inordinate love of fine dress.  She concludes, “So that, whether we be rich or poor, in all cases it is better for us that simplicity abound” (196).

P. 197-98: “Extracts from a Journal.”  Serial prose.  In diary entries, a factory woman describes her early impressions of Lowell.  The entries labeled “Sunday,” “Sabbath Eve,” and “Monday Eve” are nearly the same as passages in “Extracts from a Journal” published in the September, 1847, issue. In a new entry, “Monday Eve,” the narrator describes her first “wearisome” day working as a weaver (197). 

P. 198-99: “The Caterpillar and the Rose-Bush. A Fable” by H.E.S., Lowell [Helen E. Smith].  Ballad with commentary on class inequality.  One of the four stanzas explaining the poem’s “moral” chides the rich: “Ye who bask in the sunshine of wealth, / With worldly honors blessed, / Weigh well your voice and words to those / By poverty oppressed” (199).

P. 199-200: “Letter from Illinois” by “Ruth Rover” [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Correspondence describing some of Larcom’s experience in Illinois.

P. 201: “Tribute. From a Correspondent” by R.B., Globe Mill, Southbridge, Massachusetts.  Ballad commending The New England Offering.  Lines such as the following address class differences: “And, while the purse-proud ones of earth / Bow low at pleasure’s shrines, / Teach us, while toiling with our hands, / To labor with our minds.”

P. 201-03: “Visit to a Prairie” by A.H. Winship, Iyanibbi Seminary, Choctaw Mission [Adaline H. Winship (m. David H. Winship)].  Travel narrative.

P. 203: “Dirge” by “Valerie,” Lebanon, New Hampshire [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)].  Elegiac ballad for a woman who has died young.

P. 204-05: “The Mourner” by J.L.B., Lowell [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Sensational prose sketch.  A mother mourns for her criminal son as he is hanged.

P. 205: “My Mountain Home” by Caroline [M.] Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad concluding “Dearer, far, my mountain home, / Than a castle’s gilded dome.”

P. 206: “The Dream Fulfilled” by J.L.B. [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Ballad about a child’s death.

P. 207-08: “An Allegory” by L.A. Choate, Lowell, May, 1849 [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Prose allegory on death, “the King of Terrors” (207).

P. 208: “A Fragment. Translated from Richter.”  Praise of American freedom.

P. 209-210: “Lines Inscribed to a Friend, on His Departure for New England” by Adelaide, Choctaw Mission, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Poem in iambic pentameter.  Religious theme.

P. 210-11: “Our Town, No. 3. Our Pulpit,” Lowell [by Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.

P. 212: “Days of My Childhood” by “Myrtis Milwood,” Lawrence Corporation, 1849.  Ballad expressing nostalgia for the “Happy days of my childhood” that have “indeed passed away.”

P. 212: “Lines on the Death of K.M.” by E.L.S., North Adams, Massachusetts [Ellen L. Smith (m. Hilburn)].  Elegiac ballad.

P. 213-14: “Retrospective Glimpses of Recent Travel. Mrs. Madison” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)?].  The author recounts her visit with Mrs. Madison in Washington, D.C., expressing great admiration for her.

P. 214: “Progress” by M.R. Green, Haverhill, July, 1849 [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Satiric ballad about reformers.

P. 215-16: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley recounts some of the history of the Improvement Circle that gave birth to the Lowell Offering.  She notes “that many speak of [The New England Offering] now as entirely disconnected from the interests and sympathies of manufacturing operatives” (216).  She also mentions that she has received no written contributions from working women other than mill operatives. 

Cover iii: Continuation from cover ii of the Merrimack Division of the Mutual Improvement Circle’s constitution (1841).

Cover iv: Continuation from cover ii-iii of the Merrimack Division of the Mutual Improvement Circle’s constitution (1841).  The list of local agents includes Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and Eliza Jane Cate [n.m.], Franklin, New Hampshire.
 
 

Vol. 7, No. 10 (October 1849), p. 217-240
 

Cover ii: Engraving of the Principal Entrance, Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge and Watertown, Massachusetts.

P. 217: “Life” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad.  Life is “[m]ade of light and showers.”

P. 218-19: “Mount Auburn” by the Editor [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  History of Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge and Watertown, Massachusetts.  Includes an engraving of the Chapel at the cemetery’s entrance.

P. 220-22: “The Oak Leaf and the Morning-Glory” by A.H. Winship, Choctaw Mission, Eagletown, Arkansas [Adaline H. Winship (m. David H. Winship)].  Ballad about a child’s death.

P. 223-26: “Rosaltha, the Shepherdess; or, The Castle of Pearl” by H.F., Lowell [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Didactic allegorical essay.

P. 226: “The Auction” by Jessie Joselyn, Lawrence Corporation, Lowell.  Humorous ballad about the auction of a bachelor.

P. 227-30: “Rights and Duties of Mill Girls” by the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life” [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  In this installment, Cate’s topics are “On a Just Appreciation of the Mill Girl’s Character and Condition” and “Lydia and Jane, &c. &c.”  She insists that “the whole class [of factory women] be not thrown off from our charities and sympathies, on account of the irregularities of a few” (227).

P. 230: “Moonlight on the Waters” by “Mary May,” “Green Isle.”  Nature ballad on the ocean’s beauty.

P. 231-33: “Capt. T., or Second Love” by L.C.L., Lawrence, Massachusetts, August, 1849.  Autobiographically-based regionalist fiction set in Maine.

P. 233-34: “Familiar Letter” from “Ruth Rover,” Woodburn, Illinois, September 8, 1849 [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Larcom describes her visit to St. Louis.

P. 234-35: “Advertisement” by “Bethiah,” Bay State, Lawrence, Massachusetts.  Humorous ballad.  The speaker seeks a husband.

P. 235: “Meditation” by L.M.T., Hopkinton, Rhode Island, July, 1849.  Religious ballad.  The speaker hopes that after death, her soul will “rise to God” and that she will wear “robes of white.”

P. 235: “To Jane G—” by M—, Lowell [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)?].  Ballad.  The speaker attempts to comfort her grieving friend.

P. 236-37: “Obituary Notice” by J.L.B., Hooksett, New Hampshire, October 2, 1849 [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  The text is a letter written by Baker to Harriet Farley about the death of Eliza W. Jennings (an Offering writer) in Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, on September 8, 1849.  She died of consumption at age twenty-seven.  Following Baker’s text is a note from Farley mentioning that Jennings worked for the Middlesex Corporation and praising her. 

P. 238-40: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses the visit of the Frenchman Vattemare to the United States.  She hopes to give him copies of the Offering, etc., to display at the Vattemare Institute in Paris.  Several books are reviewed: Selections from the Writings of Mrs. Sarah C. Edgarton Mayo: with a Memoir by Her Husband; Reviews and Essays by Elihu G. Holland; Lectures on Subjects Connected with Literature and Life by Edwin P. Whipple; and History of All Nations by Samuel G. Goodrich.

Cover iii: “A Letter to the Yankee Belles, Yclept Factory Girls, of Lowell, Massachusetts” by Solomon Beau, Chairman of the Rock Co. Auxiliary of the Wisconsin Desolate Bachelors’ Association, Rock Co., Wisconsin, August, 1849.  Humorous prose.

Cover iv: “Our Post Office.” “Exchanges.”  Farley comments that in Sartain’s Magazine “is a sweet poem from Miss [Alice] Carey, entitled ‘The Mill Maid’ . . . Godey’s Lady’s Book, for October, contains the continuation of Miss Leslie’s story of  ‘The Cleyborne’s;’ in which she alludes to the appearance of factory-girls in a tableaux, with tenpenny Lowell calico gowns and bonnets of the same.  If Miss L. should come among them, perhaps she would be surprised to see how few adhere to the uniform.  And the Lowell calico is ninepenny, Miss Leslie, only ninepenny!”
 
 

Vol. 7, No. 11 & 12 (November & December 1849), p. 241-78
 

Cover ii: “Notice to Agents” and “Exchanges” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].

Facing p. 241: Engraving, “Isometrical View of the Bay State Mills and Boarding Houses, Lawrence, Massachusetts.”

P. 241: “Lawrence” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  The author discusses the Bay State Mills and Boarding Houses of Lawrence, Massachusetts.

P. 242: “What Is Life?” by “Myrtis Milwood,” Lawrence Corporation, May, 1849.  Ballad about the passage of a life.

P. 242: “The Call to Prayer” by Rosamond.  Religious ballad.

P. 243-46: “Rights and Duties of Mill Girls” by the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Factory Life” [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Serial didactic essay.  The topic is care of the sick.

P. 246: “The Spirit Guest” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad.  The speaker recounts her visit from a “loving spirit.”

P. 247-49: “Ellicott’s Mills, Maryland” by A.A.S.  The text is a letter to Farley describing Ellicott’s Mills.

P. 249: “Flowers on Graves” by “Ida St. Nicholas,” Southbridge, Massachusetts.  Ballad.

P. 250-51: “A Leaf from Life” by Rosamond, Lowell.  Fictional sketch about a family devastated by death.

P. 251: “False or True” by L[evinda] E. Leavitt, Salmon Falls, New Hampshire, December 9, 1848.  Ballad about courtship. 

P. 252: “No Time for Improvement” by J.L. Baker, Hooksett, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Brief essay advocating self-improvement.

P. 253-55: “My Childhood’s Home” by L.A.C. [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)].  Regionalist sketch describing the “humble cottage” where the author was raised.

P. 256: “My Heart is Sad” by “Rebecca,” Globe Mill, Newburyport, Massachusetts [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Ballad.

P. 256: “Sunshine” by H.F., November 7, 1849 [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad.  A psalm and prayer bring happiness to the speaker.

P. 257-60: “A Day in Arkansas” by Enilada, Choctaw Mission, Arkansas [Adaline H. Winship (m. David H. Winship)].  Regionalist sketch.

P. 260: “The Time When I Would Die” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad.  The speaker hopes to “die in my youth.”

P. 260: “Dead Rose-Buds” by L.L., July, 1849 [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature ballad.

P. 261-62: “Science” by A., Lowell [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay about the great value of science.

P. 263-66: “Extracts from a Journal.”  Serial prose.  At her parents’ request, a factory woman has written these journal entries recounting her “first impressions of Lowell.  The narrator describes her early days working as a weaver and life in the boardinghouses.

P. 267: “Dirge” by “Valiere,” Lebanon, New Hampshire [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)].  Elegiac ballad.

P. 267: “Ode to the Departed” by L[evinda] E. Leavitt, Salmon Falls, New Hampshire.  Ballad expressing the sadness of bereavement.

P. 268: “Speak Gently of the Dead” by M.F.F., Lebanon, New Hampshire [Margaret F. Foley (n.m.)].  Brief didactic essay.

P. 268: “The Departed” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad set in a graveyard.

P. 269-71: “The Uncommitted Sin” by H. Farley, “Stone House,” Lowell [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Allegorical religious fiction.  The angel of Justice and the angel of Charity consider the nature of human sin.

P. 272: “To Emily” by J.L.B., Lowell [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Elegiac poem.

P. 272: “The Broken Icicle” by L. Larcom [Lucy Larcom (n.m.].  Didactic prose composition.

P. 273: “Reflect!” by Maria, Wentworth, New Hampshire [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Brief didactic essay about the importance of reflection.

P. 274: “Lines to Mary D. P***” by “Myrtis Milwood,” Lawrence Corporation, Lowell.  Ballad.  The speaker expresses her love for her friend, from whom she must soon part.  “Mary, the thought is o’er me stealing, / That you and I must shortly part,-- / Must cease this interchange of feeling, / Which floweth now from heart to heart. . . . / I ask but this of thee-- . . . / ‘Wilt thou remember me?’”

P. 274: “The Flown Birds.”  Brief essay.

P. 275-78: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  For the last nine months, Harriet Farley has been “sole editor, proprietor, publisher, travelling agent, &c., &c.”  She indicates several of her aims as editor: “Firstly, to present to our operatives a cheerful, healthful, useful, and attractive magazine; . . . Secondly, we have wished to furnish a medium through which the one, who is now a mill-girl, and novice in the walks of literature, might send forth some token of her capacities and aspirations . . . Thirdly, it has been our wish, in this little one-sheet periodical, to lay upon the altar of our country’s literature an ‘offering’ worthy of that shrine . . .

‘Milk-and-water’ editorials, and ‘meek-eyed’ affairs, have been some of the epithets bestowed by our enemies upon our own efforts (275) . . . The charges of ‘corporation tool,’ and like epithets, must have already been refuted by the difficulty, visible to all who are willing to see, of even maintaining our existence . . . What we desire, we are willing to request openly and publicly; and it is this, that through the agents, and the overseers, the operatives may receive their copies, and transmit their subscriptions . . .

In April last the magazine was abandoned by its publisher, and left with a heavy debt and ruined credit. . . . With the issue of this number we feel that the worst is over; and if, as a publisher, we have gone on with a slow and uncertain step, it will be excused, we trust, when it is known that so heavy a burden has been upon us (276) . . .

To our writers, we will say that, in future, when at a loss for a theme for your pens, do as our new contributor from ‘Ellicott’s Mills’ has done -- describe your place of residence, your town, corporation or mill; or read the history of some great and good man, or woman, and then give, in your own words, an account of their lives.  We would not discourage poetical genius, but to rhyme, we fear, is becoming sometimes a substitute for to think” (277).  In “Book Notices,” Farley reviews Greenwood Leaves by Grace Greenwood [Sara J.C. Lippincott] and Friends in Council by Sir Arthur Helps.

Cover iii-iv: Extracts from letters received by Harriet Farley.  After reading the Offering, a Belgian woman observes, “Truly, the factory girls of America are an honor to the sex.”
 
 

Vol. 8, No. 1 (January 1850), p. 1-24
 

Cover i: The New England Offering.  Harriet Farley, Editor and Publisher. Published at Lowell, 22 Appleton Block. S.J. Varney, Printer.  The cover is illustrated with an engraving of a mill girl holding a book and gazing at a beehive.  In the background are a factory, church, and schoolhouse.  This engraving was used on the covers of the 1845 Lowell Offering issues.

Cover ii: “Amusements” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley recounts attending “a large party of the mill girls, at the boarding house which was almost a home to us.”  She also describes her “arrangements for the reception, and distribution of the Offering” in Lowell.  She comments on the Massachusetts School Committee’s Report for the year ending December 31, 1849.

Facing p. 1: Engraving, “Massachusetts and Prescott Mills.”

P. 1: “Lowell” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley cites statistics on Lowell manufactures, including average wages, etc.

P. 2-4: “A Tale of California and Cholera” by “Ruth Rover,” Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Regionalist fiction about the California gold rush.

P. 4: “A Fragment” by Caroline M. Whitney, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Ballad.  The speaker looks forward to “a far better world than is this.”

P. 5-8: “Lights and Shades” by the Author of “Rights and Duties of Mill Girls,” Franklin, New Hampshire [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Didactic domestic fiction.

P. 8: “The Contented Shepherd Boy” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad about the virtuous poor.  “They are not poor -- this vale supplies / Pearls that are worn in Paradise. ... / Oh! look upon this shepherd boy, / And learn the source of purest joy. / He, scorning wealth, and earth’s renown, / Strives only for a heavenly crown.”

P. 9-10: “Leaves by the Way-Side” by “Grace Gayfeather,” Lowell [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)?].  Serial narrative of travels in New Hampshire.  The narrator visits Sanbornton Harbor, Lake Winnipesaukee, Red Hill, and Wolfeboro.

P. 10: “The Green before the Door” by H.  Brief childhood reminiscence.

P. 11-12: “A Few Outlines of the History of Washington” by L.M.T., Hopkinton, Rhode Island.  Biographical essay about George Washington.

P. 12: “‘Let There Be Light’” by B*, Merrimack Corporation [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Religious ballad.

P. 13-17: “Ermengarde of the Rhine, and the Diamond King. A German Tale” by H.F. [Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial gothic fiction.

P. 17: “When the eagle’s wing droops . . .” by L. [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Ballad stanza.

P. 18-19: “Winter’s Dawn” by “Transcendental Sally,” Sara of Glen Viola [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)?].  Nature ballad.

P. 19: “A Scene of Early Days” by H.  Autobiographical reminiscence.

P. 20: “Burns” by J.L. Baker, Hooksett, New Hampshire [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Ballad in praise of the Scottish poet Robert Burns.  A note explains that “Burns was a ploughman, was born in poverty, lived and died in poverty . . . yet the ploughman was as much superior to the king, as five guineas are to six shillings, and infinitely more so.”

P. 20: “To Burns.”  Ballad stanza expressing appreciation for the Scottish poet Robert Burns.

P. 21-24: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley addresses the subject of “Manners, or Minor Morals.”  In the “Book Table,” she notes nine recently published titles, including Old Portraits and Modern Sketches by John Greenleaf Whittier, Robert Browning’s Poems, and The Maiden & Married Life of Mary Powell, afterwards Mistress Milton by Anne Manning, which “has been the story of the past season.”

Cover iii: Review of the magazine, Littell’s Living Age, and other miscellaneous notes.

Cover iv: “Notice to Agents.”  Table of contents.  List of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and Eliza Jane Cate, Franklin, New Hampshire [n.m.].
 
 

Vol. 8, No. 2 (February 1850), p. 25-48
 

Cover ii: “Our Exchanges” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses recent issues of Sartain’s Magazine and The Union Banner (a temperance periodical from St. Louis).

P. 25: “Mill Glen in Winter.”  Nature ballad composed in Scottish dialect.

P. 26-28: “Leaves by the Way-Side” by “Grace Gayfeather,” Lowell [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)?].  Serial travel narrative set in New Hampshire.  The narrator visits Wolfeboro, Senter Harbor, Conway, Chocura [sic], Ossipee Lake, and Mount Kearsarge.

P. 28: “Circumstances.”  Brief didactic essay.

P. 29-31: “Aunt ‘Dear Soul’” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch describing a poor widow living in a humble cottage on the outskirts of the narrator’s New Hampshire hometown.

P. 31: “The Prayer” by H.P., Lawrence Corporation.  Religious ballad.

P. 32-34: “Emma Weston, or the Mother’s Prayer” by L.E.L., Salmon Falls, New Hampshire [Levinda E. Leavitt].  Serial fiction about a widow’s daughter who leaves home to become a factory operative in order to support herself and her mother.

P. 34: “Winter Is Here” by Caroline M. Whitney.  Nature ballad.

P. 34: “Lines Addressed to My Album” by L.M.T.  Ballad.

P. 35-38: “Ermengarde of the Rhine, and the Diamond King. A German Tale” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial gothic fiction.

P. 38: “Nature” by E.A.N., Contoocook, New Hampshire.  Brief essay on the importance of nature appreciation.

P. 39-40: “A Rain-Drop” by L.B.D., Hamilton Corporation.  Didactic essay narrated from a raindrop’s point-of-view.

P. 40: “Good in All Things” by L. Larcom, Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Religious ballad on the importance of hope and faith.

P. 41-43: “The Antiquated Watch,” Choctaw Mission, Arkansas [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam) or Adaline H. Winship (m. David H. Winship)].  Narrative poem.

P. 44-45: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Further commentary on “Manners, or Minor Morals.”  Didactic, religious essay.

P. 46-48: “Book Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)]. Farley reviews Lectures and Essays by Rev. Henry Giles; A Letter to Ladies, in Favour of Female Physicians by Samuel Gregory; The Seventeenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the State Lunatic Hospital at Worcester by George Chandler; The American Sentinel (periodical); and The American Artisan (periodical).

Cover iii: “Our Exchanges” (continued from cover ii) [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley discusses recent issues of The Southern Literary Messenger, The Prisoner’s Friend, The Lady’s Book, and The Child’s Friend.  The constitution of the American Medical Education Society is reproduced.

Cover iv: Notice to Agents, table of contents, and list of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley, Amesbury, Massachusetts [Harriet Farley’s father], and Eliza Jane Cate, Franklin, Massachusetts [n.m.].
 
 

Vol. 8, No. 3 (March 1850), p. 49-72
 

Cover ii: The New England Offering, and Mill Girls’ Magazine, Written Entirely by Those Who Are or Have Been Factory Operatives.  The text of a “Letter from a Married Lady” stressing the importance of homemakers’ work is reproduced.

Facing p. 49: Engraving, “Hagar in the Wilderness.”

P. 49: “Similitudes. I. The Hidden Cascade” by L.L., Godfrey, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Brief essay about “[t]he poet’s fount of inspiration.”

P. 50-53: “Reminiscences of a Manufacturing Village. Number I. Lucy Lee” by E.J.H., Georgia, March, 1850.  Autobiographical fiction set in the author’s hometown, a manufacturing village on the Merrimack River.  The heroine, Lucy Lee, begins working in the mills at age twelve.  She studies and labors with her friend, Eliza Jane Cate [n.m.], whose friendship she greatly values.  The narrator comments that “whatever Lucy Lee has of worth or merit within her, much of it she owes to this early intercourse” (52).  Eventually she becomes a teacher, an author, and a wife and mother.  In conclusion, the narrator advises readers, “Toil, my sisters; but think also.  Raise high your standard of moral and intellectual worth.  With energy and perseverance you will reach it at last” (53).

P. 53: “Night and Its Stars” by L.Y., Lowell.  Nature ballad.

P. 54: “Prairie Sleigh Ride” by L.L., Alton, Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature ballad.

P. 54: “Earth Is Real but in Seeming” by “Transcendental Sally” [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)?].  Ballad.  Imperfect earthly experience contrasts with the heavenly “Ideal.”

P. 55-57: “Ermengarde of the Rhine, and the Diamond King. A German Tale” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Serial gothic fiction.

P. 57: “O, just one verse . . .” Humorous ballad stanza.

P. 58-59: “No” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad considering the importance of the word “no.”  Reprinted from the Series 1, No. 3 (February 1841) issue of the Lowell Offering.

P. 59: “A coquette is Winter . . .”  Humorous ballad stanza.

P. 60-63: “Letters. Letter the First. Mrs. Field to Anna Taylor” by Emma Jane Clement [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)?].  Epistolary domestic fiction.

P. 63: “Passing Away” by L.Y., Lowell.  Brief essay about the impermanence of earthly things.

P. 64: “Hagar in the Wilderness.”  Religious poem.

P. 64: “The Bereaved” by Caroline M. Whitney, South Adams, Massachusetts.  Ballad about a woman bereaved many times.

P. 65-66: “Aunt Hannah” by “Ruth Rover,” Monticello Sem., Illinois [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Biographical sketch.

P. 66: “Progress” by M.R. Green, Haverhill, Massachusetts, July, 1849 [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Satiric ballad about reformers.

P. 67: “Elegiac Lines. Suggested by Seeing the Hearse Pass, Conveying Home the Remains of ‘Miss Caroline E. Hunt,’ of Kilmarnock, Who Died at Old Town, Sept. 22, 1840” by Emma, Orono, Maine, September 23.  Elegiac ballad.

P. 67: “’Tis said love goes . . .”  Ballad stanza.

P. 68-72: “Editor’s Table” [by Harriet Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)]. Under the heading “Manners, or Minor Morals,” Farley addresses quarreling, forgiveness, and the Golden Rule.  In the “Book Table” section, Farley discusses a recent issue of The Yankee Blade, in which appears “a story, written by Alice Linwood of Lowell” and in which is announced another story “by a late Lowell editor.”  She considers at length Linwood’s Indian tale, revealing some of her own early writing experience.  Recent issues of The Child’s Friend and Littell’s Living Age are briefly reviewed.

Cover iii: Continuation from cover ii of letters received by Farley.  The titles of written contributions for the next New England Offering issue are listed.

Cover iv: Miscellaneous notes by Harriet Farley [m. John I. Donlevy].  Table of contents.  List of local agents, including Rev. Stephen Farley [Harriet Farley’s father] and Eliza Jane Cate [n.m.].
 

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