1841 12 Clark (John) Response
 
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THE FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT (1841)
THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION UPON THE WORLDLY FORTUNES OF MEN
BY HORACE MANN

RESPONSE
BY JOHN CLARK, AGENT
MERRIMACK MANUFACTURING COMPANY

 
Lowell, Massachusetts
December 3, 1841.
To: Horace Mann
 
Dear Sir, -- I owe you an apology for not having made an earlier reply to your inquiries respecting the influences of education upon the character and conduct of our operatives. I have to plead in excuse for my neglect an unusual press of business, which has almost literally occupied every moment of my time; and, while I was seeking a leisure hour to devote to this purpose, my friend, Mr. Bartlett, has kindly allowed me to read the very full and particular answers prepared by him to your several interrogations.

…We have in our mills about one hundred and fifty females who have, at some time, been engaged in teaching schools. Many of them teach during the summer months, and work in the mills in winter. The average wages of these ex-teachers I find to be seventeen and three-fourths per cent above the general average of our mills, and about forty per cent above the wages of the twenty-six who cannot write their names. It may be said that they are generally employed in the higher departments, where the pay is better. This is true; but this again may be, in most cases, fairly attributed to their better education, which brings us to the same result. If I had included in my calculations the remaining fourteen of the forty, who are mostly sweepers and scrubbers, and who are paid by the day, the contracts would have been still more striking; but having no well-educated females engaged in this department with whom to compare them, I have omitted them altogether. In arriving at the above results, I have considered the net wages merely, -- the price of board being in all cases the same. I do not consider these results as either extraordinary or surprising, but as a part only of the legitimate and proper fruits of a better cultivation and fuller development of the intellectual and moral powers.
 
Yours very respectfully,
John Clark,
Superintendent of Merrimack Mills
  
  

 
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